Tagged: food

31 May

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Scratch & Win for Prizes with Rouxbe’s New Online Cooking Game

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Global Culinary Trivia Game

New Cooking Game is Live!

The Rouxbe Online Cooking School today released a challenging and exciting new cooking game – The Global Culinary Trivia Challenge. Cooking games are a great way to test your knowledge about food and cooking, and even learn new tips and cooking information as you play. The cooking game includes text, video and image flashcard questions. How much do you think you know about cooking?

Here’s how it works: correctly answer trivia questions to advance through the kitchen brigade. Rack up points as you work your way from lowly intern to almighty executive chef. In the meantime, test your knowledge about knife skills, egg cookery, cooking methods and much more.

At the end of each cooking game level, you’ll be awarded with a new kitchen ranking and the chance to scratch and win coupon codes for Rouxbe cooking courses, annual memberships ($299 value) or even the coveted lifetime membership ($399 value with lifetime access to all current and future courses). You can’t even buy a lifetime membership anymore, so this is definitely a rare opportunity.

 Play the Rouxbe Cooking Game Now!

As you unlock ten levels of cooking trivia, you’ll be pitted against players from across the globe. Your points help your country rally ahead on the cooking game leaderboard. Individual bragging rights are also up for grabs. Think you know a thing or two about cooking? We’ll see.

It gets better. In July, we’ll be adding physical prizes from our partners. That means you can spend all of June practicing your trivia questions, and then reset the game in July for the chance to win even more.

Check out this link to start playing now.

The Rouxbe Online Cooking School Team

02 Jan

8 Comments

Moments From Ireland – Irish Soda Bread, Leek & Potato Soup…and Cows!

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Earlier this year we were lucky enough to go on a trip to Ireland to visit our dear friends the Boylan’s. A few of the highlights for me (besides the beverages galore and the most friendly hospitality) were the cows, the food and the country-side. I would even dare say, that it was in that order. The cows were just so big and beautiful and oh-so-healthy looking. They were literally everywhere I looked. I was constantly saying, “stop the car!” so I could take yet another picture of them. As for the food. I was pleasantly surprised at just how good it was. It’s not that I thought it would be bad, I just did not realized how stellar it was going to be. My two favorite things that I ate were Leek and Potato Soup and, of course, the famous Irish Soda Bread. I think I was home for a week before I had to make them both.  The great thing about this particular bread recipe is that it is easy to whip together. It also keeps well (you can even freeze it) and it makes great sandwiches and toast.Now for the country side. Wow! If you have never been to Ireland then go! And if you have been there, then I imagine that you will know what I mean when I say it is just beautiful. I still remember the day we drove by this field…it was just spectacular. The sun was moving across the field and there we cows and sheep everywhere. It was so memorable that it was like it was no real…more like a scene from a movie. 

This is a picture of our hotel…NOT! But wouldn’t it be nice :-)

Well, I could go on and on with pictures as I took more pictures on that trip than I think I have taken in my whole life.  Enjoy the Leek and Potato Soup and the Irish Soda Bread and when you are eating it, pretend you are in Ireland…of course, for that, you would likely need to have a pint of beer with your meal as well; isn’t that right Michael? :)

Cheers – dawn

08 Dec

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Amazing Crab Salad by Luxirare

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Luxirare is always thinking outside the box and this crab salad post/idea is no exception. Avocado and Craby by Luxirare

Imagine a ripe avocado stuffed with a deliciously fresh and tasty crab salad.

Filling for Crab Salad by Luxirare

How does one take all of these ingredients, mix them together and then somehow get them inside an avocado?

Crab and Avocado Filling by Luxirare

Also how does one then reconstruct the avocado to make it look like it’s original-untouched-self, still inside the peel? Curious to see how they did it?

Crab Salad by Luxirare

Here is a link to the post called “Imitation” by Luxirare.

Inside Look of Crab Salad by Luxirare

I can’t say that I would go to this much effort but I can say that I would absolutely love to eat this cool and funky creation!

Upclose of Avocado Crab Salad by Luxirare

Ciao for now- dawn

13 Jul

2 Comments

Garnish for Soup Video Cooking Tip

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We recently released two lessons on making soups from scratch:

Broth-Based Clear Soups and Stock-Based Clear Soups.

To add an extra-special, finishing touch to these homemade soups, we have created several sexy garnish recipes. Garnish adds color, flavor, texture and visual appeal to any dish. This drill down demonstrates a few of the endless items that can not only be used to garnish soups, but also a variety of other dishes. The most important thing to remember when garnishing any dish is that it must always be edible and something you would normally eat. While a whole sprig of rosemary might be pretty, nobody is going to sit there and chew on it :)

Click on the images below to go directly to the recipes and techniques for the garnishes shown in this video.

Fresh Basil Oil
Fresh Basil Oil

Golden Crispy Crostini
Golden Crispy Crostini

Fried Herbs
Fried Herbs

Tortilla Strips
Tortilla Strips

Fried Capers
Fried Capers

Croutons
Croutons

Roasted Tomato Oil
Roasted Tomato Oil

How to Roast Nuts
How to Roast Nuts

Fried Shallots
Fried Shallots

Fried Leeks
Fried Leeks

Parmesan Crisps
Parmesan Crisps

Happy Cooking!

The Rouxbe Cooking School Team

28 Jun

6 Comments

How to get kids to eat Everything

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I have heard that some parents struggle to get their kids to eat a variety of things. Many parents simply don’t have a strategy. I used one I learned from my grandfather.

When I was four, I stayed many weeks with my grandparents. My grandmother was an excellent cook, and my grandfather a very good gardener who dearly loved his food. He especially loved eel. In fact, I often shopped with my grandmother at the fishmonger and I was given the responsibility of choosing the live eel from the tank which would eventually end up on my grandfather’s plate. He took educating his grandchildren very seriously, and on this occasion used eel as part of his strategy. He had invited an old army friend for lunch who was quite excited about these eels himself. I had never tried them, and never wanted to, but suddenly all this anticipation of eels made me curious. I was given a bowl of noodle soup, but all I remember wanting that afternoon was some of that eel stuff. When the casserole of the eels came out of the old wood-fueled oven, the guest’s eyes lit up. My goodness, I thought, these things must really be good. My grandma basted them with the tomato-based sauce, finished them with a few drizzles of olive oil, and brought them to the table. They were shiny, piping hot, cut into chunks. There was nothing else to accompany them. They looked magnificent. Was there enough for me? I was shy, too afraid to ask my grandfather if I could have some. These were made especially for him and his war buddy. I ate my soup quietly but stared at the eels and mesmerized by the gestures of incredible pleasure made by the old guest. His eyes, his nose, his brows, his chin, his hands, even his feet expressed a pleasure I had never seen before by someone eating food. Can food do this? My soup is good, but it’s not doing the same thing for me. Soup is for babies. I wanted what they were having. I absolutely had to know what those eels tasted like, but not courageous enough to intrude on their eel-tasting bliss.

Luckily the old guest noticed that I coveted his eel. He asked me if I had ever eaten eel before. I simply replied, “No”. I could have pressed, but obviously not brave enough. However, the kind old man then asked me if I’d like some. But I ruined the opportunity by turning to my grandfather instead of jumping to the offer.

He’s not ready for something like eel yet, my grandfather said. My disappointment was almost unbearable, but I knew not to make any scene. And then came the lesson: Eel is an acquired taste. First you acquire the taste for chicken. Then you acquire the taste for rabbit. Then you acquire the taste for carp. And only then are you ready for eel. I knew exactly where he was going with this. I often refused to eat rabbit, which my grandfather likes to eat at least once a week. And I simply disliked the smell of fried fish, especially carp, which he also loved. In order to eat the eel, I had to graduate to it. And it worked. I ate rabbit and carp to my grandfather’s delight, eventually to mine too. I did eventually graduate to the eel. I remember the day I chose the eel for my plate, a day as special as when I bought my first pair of hockey skates. The eel was delicious. Today I describe it as a combination of rabbit and carp.

Tony Minichiello

Culinary Instructor, NWCAV

Filed Under: Food & Industry Talk

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